How to boost your productivity through aimlessness

After so many blogs about reaching your goals, it’s time to write one about practicing aimlessness. Learning aimlessness through meditation can help you get to new levels of understanding which will help you on your path to accomplishing your dreams. 

It is more than a benefit of meditation; we aim to appreciate aimlessness through meditation. According to Cal Newport’s Deep Work, most people can only do four hours of deep work a day. Yet most of us work eight hours daily, leaving a lot of time for shallow work and counter-productive distractions. 

Practicing aimlessness is a great way to boost your productivity, creativity and overall well-being. These benefits arise because it gives your brain a chance to rest. We are most productive when we are focused, but to be focused, we must give our mind a break and let it wander through its synaptic forest. 

We do our best work during this unfocused period because our minds can connect information syntopically. However, for these connections to occur, we must collect new experiences. What you contribute to the world is based on what you’ve lived. 

We should all be aimless like Humbolt.

The more you experience, the more connections you can make between unrelated activities. To take an old scientist of a foregone era as an example, let’s look at Alexander van Humboldt. Humboldt – which inspired Darwin – was one of the most revered scientists of his time. 

His knowledge combined the latest teachings and his observations of European, South American and Asian mountains. His value to society was the fact that he never stopped learning. Through university lectures, conversations and observation, he constantly expanded his knowledge and shared it through books such as Cosmos.

His studies lead to the development of the study of ecology. Many who knew him would have accused him of wasting time measuring everything, reading every book, and climbing every volcano. Still, it was only through this seemingly aimless behaviour that he could develop his understanding of the universe.

Insights gained through aimlessness.

We have experienced a moment while showering or doing the dishes when an intuitive answer pops into our heads. Here is a quote from Einstein to better illustrate my point:

“A new idea comes suddenly and in a rather intuitive way, but intuition is nothing but the outcome of earlier intellectual experience.”

Albert Einstein

Note the words he uses in that quote, particularly “intellectual” and “experience.” Einstein knew that the secret to a new idea is to let your intelligence be free while experiencing new things. After all, his theory of relativity was sparked by his observation of the relative position of a park bench.

Would that idea have been possible without that bike ride? Maybe, he was a brilliant man, but he needed to practice aimlessness for his brilliance to shine. You, too, can learn to take full advantage of this aimlessness through meditation. 

Why meditating helps

To meditate is to focus the mind entirely on a single object. That object can be a cup of coffee, a piece of chocolate, or even a glass of wine. While it can be as exciting as those objects, more common objects of focus are your breath, thoughts, or visualization

The purpose of meditation is not to have a goal; to meditate, you must spend time enjoying aimlessness. While focusing your mind might sometimes feel like trying to control a caged bear, it is by paying attention to that bear that you learn to free it.

The longer you try to keep that bear in a cage by distracting it with shiny objects like social media and popcorn, the more restless the bear becomes. As the bear becomes restless from constant shallow entertainment, it will demand more stimulation. 

Rather than trying to direct the bear’s attention to an ever-shiner or tastier object, you can tame it by paying attention to where its attention is. As thoughts arise, simply notice them and let them pass through you. Eventually, your mind will be free to do what it feels, and you will be much more relaxed as you will no longer be fighting against it. 

Remember to have fun.

There are so many things to remember these days that we forget to have fun. We’re all busy trying to lead these productive, impressive, Instagram-perfect lives that the concept of fun escapes us.

Laugh, dance, sing, love and be jolly. Find a reason to be grateful and focus on your blessings. Joy is contagious; the more you find, the more joy there is in those around you. Start small if you want to make a change and bring more fun into your life. 

Small lifestyle changes are more sustainable and can lead to larger long-term benefits. That being said, staying focused and remembering to have fun can be challenging. I am here to make it easier. 

If you are looking for someone to keep you accountable and help you along your path to change, let’s connect. Subscribe to my newsletter below and get a free 1-hour coaching session. Let’s discuss what you want to achieve. 

working on it…
Welcome to the long longevity community.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: